True North Pacific Rockfish, $16/lb

July 11, 2014 in Recipe, Seasonal Wild Catch

With more flavor than halibut, this firm textured flakey white fish adds a fresh seafood taste to any saute, soup, or fried fish sandwich.  Rockfish is available through Otolith at various stores and farm markets for $15/lb.

Wild Alaskan Seafood, Caught by Wild Alaskans; Cooked by You!

Serving Suggestions:

  • Thai Curry Rockfish with Jasmine Rice – Ingredients:1 tablespoon Thai red curry paste,   1 cup water,
    2 1/2 cups canned unsweetened coconut milk, 1/2 cup chopped fresh basil, 2 pounds of rockfish, 1 1/2 cups purchased broccoli slaw, 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice, 2 cups hot cooked jasmine rice or medium-grain rice (2/3 cup raw), 2 tablespoons fish sauce (nam pla; optional), and 2 cups cooked jasmine rice
    Using a deep hot skillet, sear portioned rockfish in butter, seasame seed oil, or coconut oil,  until golden on both sides then remove the rockfish from the skillet and set it aside.  Place curry paste in he large skillet. Whisk in 1/2 cup coconut milk. Bring to boil; boil 1 minute. Stir in remaining 2 cups coconut milk and 1 cup water. Add broccoli slaw, rockfish, and tomato. Return to boil. Reduce heat to low; cover and simmer until rockfish is cooked, about 3 minutes. Add basil, lime juice, and fish sauce, if desired. Season with salt and pepper.Press hot rice into four 2/3-cup custard cups, dividing equally. Invert cups to unmold rice into 4 bowls. Spoon stew around rice and serve.

cider-brined coho salmon with dijon cream

April 17, 2014 in Recipe

http://www.recipe.com/cider-brined-coho-salmon-with-dijon-cream/

Ingredients

  • 1  pound fresh coho salmon fillet
  • 1   cup cold water
  • 1   cup apple cider
  • 2   tablespoons kosher salt
  • 1/4  cup snipped fresh tarragon
  • 1/2  teaspoon ground black pepper
  • Nonstick cooking spray or grape seed oil
  • 1   tablespoon olive oil
  • 1   tablespoon butter
  • 1   large shallot, finely chopped
  • 1   tablespoon all-purpose flour
  • 1/2  cup dry white wine
  • 1/2  cup whipping cream
  • 2   teaspoons Dijon-style mustard
  • 1/2  teaspoon salt
  • Fresh tarragon sprigs (optional)
Directions
1. Rinse salmon; pat dry with paper towels. Place salmon in a large resealable plastic bag set in a shallow dish. For marinade: In a medium bowl, stir together the water, cider, and kosher salt until salt dissolves. Stir in snipped tarragon and pepper. Pour over salmon; seal bag. Marinate in the refrigerator for 4 hours, turning bag occasionally.
2. Preheat broiler. Line a baking sheet with foil; lightly coat foil with nonstick cooking spray or oil. Drain salmon, discarding marinade. Pat salmon dry with paper towels. Discard brine. Place salmon, skin side down, on prepared baking sheet. Brush salmon with olive oil. Broil 5 to 6 inches from the heat for 5 to 7 minutes or until fish flakes when tested with a fork. Remove from broiler; and cover with foil to keep warm.
Meanwhile, for sauce:
3. In a small saucepan melt butter over medium heat. Add shallot; cook and stir for 4 to 5 minutes or until tender. Stir in flour. Cook and stir for 1 minute. Add wine, cream, mustard and 1/2 teaspoon salt, whisking until smooth. Cook and stir until thickened and bubbly; cook and stir 1 minute more. Remove from heat. Place salmon on a serving platter. Drizzle with sauce. If you like, garnish with tarragon springs. Makes 4 servings.

Halibut that Tastes as Fresh as it Looks, $25/lb

November 21, 2013 in Recipe

Otolith sells the best halibut in the tri-state area.  Owing to the size of our company, we do not carry halibut inventory from a previous season.  Otolith’s halibut is always the most recent harvested fish on the market.  Because halibut is so lean any amount of dehydration from halibut stored in excess of 6 months can be detected by almost anyone who eats fish.  Older, even the most carefully handled, halibut will taste less moist after 6 months of frozen storage.

In addition to purchasing halibut from Otolith Sustainable Seafood, another way to maintain the moist fresh taste of halibut is to avoid over cooking halibut.  One simple technique for cooking halibut evenly without drying it out is to cut the fillet into portions before cooking it.  Ex. When cooking a boneless skinless 1 lb piece of halibut that is more than 3/4 inch thick, cut the fillet into 3/4 inch thick medalions before cooking.  Each medalian will cook uniformly and evenly using high heat, a bit of oil, and limiting the cooking time to 10 minutes per inch of thickness [3/4 inch equals 8 minutes].

 

2013 Summer’s Sockeye

October 24, 2013 in Recipe, Seasonal Wild Catch

Otolith’s 2013 harvested wild sockeye from Southeast’s Petersburg Alaska vicinity is packaged in average weight 1 pound vacuum sealed packs.  In your home freezer it will maintain its quality for up to two months and under the careful storage and handling of Otolith’s professional  staff our wild sockeye may be enjoyed for months to come and throughout the new year.

Nothing is simpler and more satisfying that pan seared sockeye with lemon and olive oil dressed cabbage salad.

Ingredients:

1 lb sockeye – cut into 1/3 portions

1/2 -1/4 head of finely sliced cabbage

Juice of one fresh lemon

1 tsp of grape-seed oil for searing

3 Tbs of evoo

salt and pepper to taste

Prepare:

Add grape-seed oil to preheated skillet, med to high heat.   Place sockeye salmon fillet skin up in hot oil, cover and sear for three minutes until fillet portions flip easily.  Cover again and cook for an additional 5 minutes on the skin side down.  Meanwhile, combine most of the lemon juice, cabbage, EVOO, and salt and pepper, reserving some lemon juice to serve over cooked fillets just before serving.  Do not over cook sockeye.  Remove from heat immediately after total cooking time of 8 minutes and allow fillet portions to rest for up to 4 minutes.  Pour reserved lemon juice over cooked fillet portions while resting.

Sushi Lesson in Philadelphia featuring Otolith’s Wild Seafood

August 29, 2013 in Recipe

Date: Friday, August 23rd, 2013

Time: 7:00pm

Place:  Indy Hall, 20 N 3rd St; Philadelphia, 19106

Price: $50 Per Person

RSVP: ben@otolithonline.com

Please email the above and let us know the best time to contact you to reserve your spot with a Credit Card. Event is limited to the first 23 registered guests.

Otolith’s hands on sushi lesson event includes an introduction to the art and preparation of sushi, instruction and demonstration for rolling your own Uramaki, Hosomaki and Futomaki, condiments, tools and ingredients such as King salmon, King Crab, Smoked Sablefish and assorted vegetables necessary for each participant to roll and make three individually designed sushi rolls plus warm organic green tea and mochi ice cream dessert.  All participating guests are welcomed to keep their sushi rolling mats and chop sticks.

Sushi Lesson in Philadelphia featuring Otolith’s Wild Seafood

July 24, 2013 in Events, Recipe

Otolith’s hands on sushi lesson event includes an introduction to the art and preparation of sushi, instruction and demonstration for rolling your own Uramaki, Hosomaki and Futomaki, condiments, tools and ingredients such as King salmon, King Crab, Smoked Sablefish and assorted vegetables necessary for each participant to roll and make three individually designed sushi rolls plus warm organic green tea and Mochi ice cream dessert.  All participating guests are welcomed to keep their sushi rolling mats and chop sticks.

Date: Friday, August 23rd, 2013

Time: 7:00pm

Place:  Indy Hall, 20 N 3rd St; Philadelphia, 19106

Price: $50 Per Person

RSVP: ben@otolithonline.com

Please email the above and let us know the best time to contact you to reserve your spot with a Credit Card.

Event is limited to the first 23 registered guests. B.Y.O.B

Winter Braised Blackcod with Onion Salad

March 1, 2013 in Recipe

Sablefish $23/lb

Smoked Sablefish $29/lb

Now that Spring is just around the corner, we have to remain patient for a short while longer.  The following savory winter smoked blackcod recipe was created to infuse nutrients and flavor in order to draw attention back to the pleasure and simplicity of a relaxed home cooked winter meal.  I recommend serving this dish with quartered and roasted purple Yukon potatoes, fingerlings, Baby Red or Yukon Gold.  Potatoes should be cooked ahead of the fish and kept warm.  The acidity of the braising liquid compliments the starch of potatoes and the richness of blackcod and all will contrast nicely to the zesty fresh flavors of an onion salad.

Ingredients:

1 ½ cups of any white wine
½ teaspoon  sea salt
½ cup water
4 [smoked or unsmoked] black cod fillets with skin on, 5 to 7 ounces each – thawed
dash of [smoked or sweet] paprika for garnish

Salad Ingredients:

1/2 bunch of choped flat leaf parsley – leaves only
1 purple onion – 1/4 inch slices
2 Tbs sea salt
¼-½ tsp sumac seasoning to taste [purple Turkish spice]

  • Preheat oven to 400 degrees.  In a small glass dish just large enough to place (4) cut and portioned fillets skin side up, combine the first three ingredients.  Then place the portioned fillets skin side up in the dish and let stand for ½ hour at room temperature.
  • In a small bowl, combine sliced onion and 2 Tbs of salt.  Let stand for 30 minutes at room temperature.
  • Turn over the smoked blackcod fillets in their liquid and place the glass dish on the top rack uncovered into the 400 degree oven for 15 minutes.  Use a timer if available.
  • While fish is cooking, gently squeeze the salted onion slices in over the sink to drain off excess moisture.  Taste the onion to check if it is too salty to serve.  Onion should be softer and not too salty.  Onion can be rinsed with cold water and resqueezed of excess water if necessary.  When the onion is salted just right to taste, add the parsley and sumac to the onion.  Serve braised blackcod hot; after pouring any remaining braising liquid over the fish and other vegetables garnish the cooked smoked  blackcod with the dash of smoked or traditional paprika and serve with Onion Salad.  Avoid excessive smoke flavor by using sweet paprika on smoked blackcod and using smoked paprika if using raw blackcod.
  • Serving suggestion – Roasted root vegetables such as baby red potatoes, beets and red carrots or squash such as acorn or butternut go well with this dish. Roasted vegetables can be cleaned, cut, oiled and placed into the oven before the recipe is started.  The blackcod can be added to the oven about 15 minutes before the vegetables are done.  Because blackcod is harvested in the fall it is an excellent fish to serve in the winter and its bright white color provides appealing contrast to the rich colors of beets, red or gold potatoes, red carrots, or squash while blackcod’s abundant trace minerals compliment the vitamins of the fresh fall harvest.

Smoked Salmon and Shrimp Scampi: Easy and Spectacular

February 2, 2013 in Recipe, Seasonal Wild Catch

Prawn scampi as a main course with smoked salmon appetizers

Smoked Salmon and Prawn Scampi are deliciously easy

Serving Otolith’s smoked salmon as an appetizer and scampi made with Otolith’s shrimp, prawns and/or crab, you will relish the spectacular flavors and lavish in the time you have to spend with your friends or family.  Whether you have parties on the horizon or just want to make any night special, having made these two recipes for 20 guests myself on December 24, 2012, I know first hand the incredible results of a little effort that will make you and the company you keep feel splendid.

Smoked Coho Salmon w/ Tapenade

Time: 15 minutes to prepare; Serves 5
Ingredients:
1 lb of smoked coho salmon strips – cut into 1/2 – 3/4  inch pieces
2 Tbs capers – cut in half or diced up, not pureed
8 oz of pitted kalamata olives – half or coarse chop
7 oz roasted red pepper – 1/2 inch diced
1 tsp fresh lemon juice
2 Tbs EVOO – extra virgin olive oil
2 baguettes – sliced thin for easy eating pieces
2 Tbs chopped fresh parsley – divided

Coarse tapenade can be made up to one day in advance.  Slice bread and smoked fish no more than 5 hours before serving.  Refrigerate smoked fish before serving and keep bread and fish each wrapped air tight to preserve freshness until served.  Place sliced baguette directly onto your serving platter and cover with plastic wrap.

Mix capers, olives, lemon juice, EVOO and red pepper; cover and set aside in a small serving bowl or pretty ramekin.  Keep covered and refrigerated until ready to serve.

Serve smoked salmon on a small plate.  One half hour before serving, place salmon plate and tapenade bowl on opposite ends of a large oval platter with the sliced baguette down the center of the platter and garnish with remaining parsley sprinkled across the platter.

 

Shrimp Scampi

It is tradition to make this recipe using prawns rather than shrimp.  Here is my own recipe using what ever Otolith shellfish is on hand.

Time: 20 minutes to prepare/20 minutes to cook; Serves 5
Ingredients:

2 pounds of raw shellfish – prawns, shrimp or crab; peeled and shells set aside.  If you are using crab then steam the crab before shelling and reserve only the strained liquid and shelled meat.  Crab shells can be composted or discarded.  Raw shrimp and prawn shells make an excellent stock for this recipe otherwise the water from the boiled pasta will work too.

1-1/2  cups of warm shellfish stock – strained liquid of boiled shells in 1-2 pints of water; set flavors for 20 minutes before straining [optional]
3 shallot – fine diced bits
5 garlic cloves – fine chopped or grated
1/4 c. of fresh lemon juice
1 cup of fresh parsley chopped
1 dried hot red chili pepper – chopped fine [optional]
1 stick of butter – unsalted
2 Tbs EVOO – divided
1 tsp capers – chopped [optional]
1 small fresh ripe tomato – diced small [optional]
1 large mushroom – sliced thin [optional]
1 c. grated Parmesan cheese for topping [optional]
1 lb of cooked hot pasta – not linguine or fettuccine

Cook 1 lb of any pasta except linguine or fettuccini according to its package and reserve 1- 1/2  cup hot pasta liquid if you elect not to make stock from your shellfish shells.  Coat hot pasta with 1/2 the EVOO to prevent clumping.  I prefer angel hair or orzo for Otolith’s Scampi.

In a large deep skillet, using medium heat not high, melt the butter, add 1/2 the EVOO then saute the garlic and shallots until just soft – about 5 minutes.  Add the peeled shellfish to the hot sizzling butter, oil and garlic mixture; do not brown butter or garlic.  Let the mixture cook without too much stirring for 3 minutes.  Gently turn over the shellfish so each side is cooked without over handling them; cook an additional 3 minutes.  Then if you are using them – add the capers, tomato, or mushroom; cook for another 3 minutes.  When the prawns are fully cooked add the 1 -1/2 of hot stock to the skillet and simmer together for another 3 minutes.  Add the lemon juice and the parsley then season to taste with salt and white pepper.  Turn off the heat and add 1/2 of the hot cooked pasta to your skillet to coat with sauce and shellfish then add the remaining pasta and toss gently.  You may need to use tongs or scoop shellfish from the bottom of the pan and place back on top of the pasta before serving so everyone can see the beautiful scampi over the pasta.  If you using tongs to transfer angel hair pasta to a serving dish after it is coated in the sauce then you can pour the scampi over the pasta in your serving bowl.  Serve scampi with Parmesan cheese on the side.

Suggestion: Make what you can in advance to allow time with guests.  You can peel the shrimp or prawns and make a stock up to 7 hours ahead of time.  Keep your stock and shellfish refrigerated until you are ready to use and remember to warm up the stock before you start to cook the scampi.   You may make the pasta and prepare the chopped ingredients up to one hour ahead; these do not need to be kept cold – room temp is fine for one hour.  The final assembly will take about 20 minutes however you can prepare the scampi 1/2 hour before serving and just heat it up in about 5 minutes before adding the cooked pasta. If your quests are eating smoked coho then they won’t miss you as much when you step away to put the finishing touches of the scampi together.