Sushi Lesson in Philadelphia featuring Otolith’s Wild Seafood

November 5, 2012 in Seasonal Wild Catch

Let your creativity run wild like Otolith's fish

SOLD OUT!

Date: Friday, April 26th, 2013

Time: 7:00pm-9:30pm

Place: COOK at 253 S. 20th Street; Philadelphia, PA 19103

RSVP: https://shop.audreyclairecook.com/SearchResults.asp?Cat=1814

This Event is SOLD OUT!  Please contact COOK to request another Otolith Sushi Lesson Event.

Otolith’s hands on sushi lesson event includes an introduction to the art and preparation of sushi, instruction and demonstration for rolling your own Uramaki, Hosomaki and Futomaki, condiments, tools and ingredients such as King salmon, Dungeness crab, Sablefish and assorted vegetables necessary for each participant to roll and make three individually designed sushi rolls plus warm organic green tea and mochi ice cream dessert.  All participating guests are welcomed to keep their sushi rolling mats and chop sticks.

2012 Summer Sockeye is in Philly

August 2, 2012 in Seasonal Wild Catch

Redoubt Bay: A Link between the Beginning and the End of Life for Sockeye. In Southeast Alaska, the Redoubt Bay sockeye return this season has exceeded recent years. This is good news for the wild sockeye and for those of us looking forward to a small taste of this magnificent renewable resource. On July 12th the Alaska Department of Fish and Game announced modest increased limits for harvesters of Redoubt Bay sockeye. Otolith's 2012 sockeye were harvested during that same week and the freshest tasting portion fillets of sockeye are on their way to Philadelphia. Once harvested the sockeye are dressed or in other words headed and gutted with bellies packed on ice.

After a few days of harvesting dressed fish are either delivered or transported by way of another vessel called a tender back to landing port.Otolith’s sockeye were landed in Petersburg, AK and all cutting, sealing and freezing was performed by a small local processor.The following pictures were taked during processing:With skill and attention to detail each fillet must be carefully handled to assure the quality of the sockeye is protected.

The Most Beautiful of all Wild Salmon

Lastly, Otolith’s wild sockeye delicacy is frozen at temperatures down to -40.  This ultra-cold process takes only minutes to acheive the sushi-grade results that Otolith’s owners and clients have come to appreciate.

Just Before the Blast-freeze

The coho harvest is underway.  We look forward to sourcing all your wild and and sustainable salmon this year!  Cheers from Alaska.

What Constitutes a Sustainable Wild Fishery?

June 1, 2012 in Seafood For Thought

Not All Fishing Gear is Sustainable

The following opinion is in response to the recent New York Times article, http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/24/opinion/eat-your-hake-and-have-it-too.html.

Sustainable wild fisheries are the result of healthful fish, responsible exploitation, self-sustaining cycles of new harvesters replacing the oldest harvesters,  and a consistent range of abundant biomass within the fishery food-chain.  In the minds of wild seafood aficionados like myself, sustainable fisheries are the dream that contrasts our present reality.  Fisheries continue to buckle under the consolidation of more efficient gear and larger scale harvesters, the average age of fisherman continues to rise as less men and women find economic security in serving their fellow fish consumers by catching wild fish, governments continue to subsidize factory fishing operations inspite of its consequences, fishery managers remain unable to effectively protect the biomass of fish on the lowest rungs of our fishery food-chain assuring the inevitable collapse of more valuable species that exist higher up the food-chain, and  many people remain uncertain about the healthfulness and presence of heavy metals in their wild fish and shellfish.

Now that there is no misunderstanding about what constitutes a sustainable fishery, we can discuss how to encourage behaviors that will take us closer to our goal, if in fact sustainability is the goal.  To that point, all states that have a commercially exploited fishery within their jurisdiction either have a constitutional amendment that includes the protection of its fisheries for the benefit of long term sustainable yield or not.  Therefore, the most “apparent conservation benefits from the refusal of consumers to buy [those] over-fished species” is the continued focus on wild fisheries, furthermore perhaps opportunities may increase for new educated minds to become involved in the ongoing effort to make the dream of sustainable fisheries come true.

Additionally, otter trawl fishing gear produces the majority of haddock [in Maine], while the remainder of the catch is taken with [less efficient] longlines or gillnets.  Assuming that since fisheries had never before experienced the current threat of overfishing until the use of trawl fishing gear became widespread, it could be that consumers refusal to to buy fish that is almost exclusively harvested by trawlers or that is not traceable to its harvesters is an act of protest against trawling.

To conclude, a better goal for NOAA might be to rebuild over-fished species back to levels that had existed prior to overfishing.  Using inconcise language such as ‘healthy’ to describe populations of over-fished species is no less useful than labeling an entire species as “Red Listed”.   Otolith applauds the state of Alaska for constitutionally protecting its fisheries.  After establishing a brand that identifies fish harvested against all odds and in consideration of the greatest efforts to date toward the goal of achieving sustainable fisheries, I would welcome the opportunity to do more for our fisheries.    Someday there can be far fewer trawlers and more skilled fishermen, much less plastic in our oceans and more fish surviving to maturity, more laws to protect our renewable fishery resources and the healthfulness of our fish, and less regulations that serve only to increase the challenges to sustainable harvesters.

“I have a Dream”, Dr. Martin Luther King; me too.

 

Seafood Gift Packages

April 26, 2012 in Slideshow

All shipments are packaged to stay frozen for up to 24 hours

Otolith ships Seafood Gift Packages to arrive the next day to you in perfect condition.  Available couriers include UPS, Fed Ex and Otolith’s Delivery Service.

Ordering Seafood Gift Packages

Email sales@otolithonline.com or call 215-426-4266.  Your order request will be returned within 24 hours.  Orders placed Monday-Thursday will ship the following week on Thursday.  Orders placed by Friday-Sunday will ship on the first available Thursday.  All fish deliveries arrive the next day or overnight and are packaged by Otolith to arrive frozen.  You may request a specific future Thursday shipment date to assure the arrival of your fish on the Friday of your convenience.  You may designate a shipping preference for either Fed Ex or UPS.

Overnight Shipping Charges

Shipping charges are calculated using the least expense overnight guaranteed ground service available plus a $5 handling fee.  Based on an average order weight of 7 lbs plus packaging, most shipments cost $20 to ship within PA, NJ, DE, and NY.  Shipment delivered outside of PA, NJ, DE, and NY will be sent express overnight air and will cost more.  The $5 handling fee will be waived for any CSS member’s purchase to be shipped overnight delivery

Minimum Order

Otolith requires a minimum purchase of 7 lbs for all orders being shipped overnight.  Blast-frozen sushi grade fish will stay frozen when properly insulated and temperature controlled using frozen gel packs.  Shipping fish less than 7lbs substantially increases the amount of frozen gel packs necessary to assure frozen quality and sushi grade fish.  In the interest of our customers, we prefer that all orders to ship overnight must purchase a minimum of 7lbs unless written authorization is provided via email to assure for the payment and the use of sufficient gel packs necessary to quality and frozen delivery.  sales@otolithonline.com.

Thawing and Cooking

April 25, 2012 in Slideshow

20 Minute Quick Thaw

Otolith’s Quick Thaw© Directions*

Always puncture, cut or release vacuum seal of fresh/frozen Otolith sustainable seafood before thawing.  Thaw your seafood while in its specifically designed pouch.  Use a sharp knife to make a very small puncture in the top corner of the pouch. [Note: USDA Safe Defrosting Methods]

Place punctured pouch in clean warm water.   Do not allow the warm water to get into the protective pouch.  Replace warm water after 10 minutes .  Most fillets take 20 minutes to thaw.  Filets larger than 3/4 inch thick may take longer.

Otolith’s fish is sushi-grade and may be eaten raw up to 6 hours only after it has been thawed using Otolith’s Quick Thaw© directions and provided it is kept dry and stored between 34-40 degrees using refrigeration to control the temperature of your sushi-grade fish. 

Raw fish and sushi may be served for up to 2 hours on pre-chilled plates using frozen gel packs beneath the plates to control the plate temperature while serving.  Using gel packs to control the temperature of raw fish reduces the the amount of time raw fish will remain safe for consumption.  Do not eat raw fish that has been improperly handled or stored.

Refrigerated Thaw: place open pouch in clean bowl and allow to set in refrigerator for 5-8 hours to thaw depending on the thickness of the seafood.  Thicker fillets or whole fish may take longer.

To enjoy the superior quality and fresh taste of Otolith premium seafood, please consume within 3 days of thawing seafood.  Nonetheless, Otolith’s sustainable seafood once thawed will remain safe to cook and eat for up to 7 days.  While fillets and shellfish may be rinsed with cold water and pat dry with a clean towel before cooking, never soak seafood directly in water.  Always thaw in pouch or open air and remember to cut the pouch and release the vacuum seal prior to thawing.

Cooking Directions – Cutting portions before cooking can prevent over cooking thinner pieces provided you remove thinner portions of cooked seafood from the heat source once cooked.  Cook fillets at 400 degrees for 10 minutes per inch of thickness.  Most pieces take 6-8 minutes.  Cut into portions before cooking; cutting seafood into portions before cooking does not reduce the quality of your premium Otolith fish or shellfish provided you make clean cuts using a sharp knife.  For more specific cooking tips and directions, please use the products drop down menu to visit the specific page for each species of fish or shellfish.

*Recommended by Otolith not the USDA.  Otolith LLC, Community Supported Seafood LLC, their affiliates and/or heirs are not responsible for the improper use of Otolith’s Quick Thaw© technique.  Otolith’s Rapid Thaw© technique was designed to allow for the highest quality and safest consumption of sushi grade raw fish and cooked seafood.  Proper use of Otolith’s Quick Thaw© only allows for the safe consumption of raw fish for no more than 6 hours provided the fish once thawed is continually stored under refrigeration temperatures between 34-38°.  Improper handling of Quick Thaw© fish or shellfish will reduce the amount of time that fish can safely be eaten raw.  Example:  Sushi rolls served on a chilled plate without gel packs should be eaten within 40 minutes or discarded.  All raw fish should be held at a controlled temperature [34-40°] to sufficiently inhibit the growth of dangerous bacteria and other micro-organisms.